New Hampshire's and MA Demerit Point System

The New Hampshire Department of Motor Vehicles (DMV) follows a very strict demerit system for drivers who violate the law. The Director can suspend or revoke a person’s driver’s license for conviction of unsafe driving. There are 50 offenses, categorized into one, two, three, four, or six point offenses. (This is determined by the severity of the offense).

If you are deemed careless or reckless or if you have destroyed property, your license may be at risk. Your citation will include the offense and the associated points.

How Does the Point System Work?

One-point offenses are violations that have something to do with either registration, vehicle inspection, sharing the road with other cars and pedestrians, or minor traffic violations such as failing to signal or operating without a license.

Two point offenses are a bit more serious. Some of these offenses include, but are not limited to:

  • Operating a vehicle that is not registered
  • Failing to produce a license upon an officer’s request
  • Operating a vehicle with improper class of license
  • Failing to comply with police directions

The three point offenses include the following violations:

  • Disobeying any traffic control device
  • Following too closely
  • Driving on a sidewalk
  • Failing to yield right of way
  • Failing to obey stop and yield signs

These violations are worth four points off your license:

  • Operating a motor vehicle without a license
  • Improper passing
  • Driving more than 25 mph above the posted speed limit.

The most extreme driver violation is a six-point violation. These are very serious and are much more likely to result in jail time—especially without an experienced attorney working for you. These include:

The entire list includes over 50 possible violations. For a complete list, visit the New Hampshire DMV website. It is important to know that points will stay on your record for 3 years.

One way to avoid unnecessary penalties is to check the status of Your Driver's License. To do this, you can get a copy of your driving record report.

How Do I Deal With a Suspended License?

If your driver’s license is suspended, it may remain suspended for 3-12 months depending on your point and age. There is a breakdown of points based on age below:

Drivers under the age of 21

  • 6 points in one calendar year: three months suspension.
  • 12 points in two consecutive calendar years: up to six months suspension.
  • 18 points in three consecutive calendar years: up to one-year suspension.

Drivers between the ages of 18 - 20

  • 9 points in one calendar year: up to three months suspension.
  • 15 points in two consecutive calendar years: up to six months suspension.
  • 21 points in three consecutive calendar years: up to one-year suspension.

Drivers who are 21 and older

  • 12 points in one calendar year: up to three months suspension.
  • 18 points in two consecutive calendar years: up to six months suspension.
  • 24 points in three consecutive calendar years: up to one-year suspension.

The cost of dealing with the suspension of your license can be very expensive. It is best to work with an attorney who can work to try and reduce your charges. Additionally, there is a point’s reduction program that you may be eligible for. If you have been certified as a habitual offender, contact NH criminal defense attorney Kevin M. Tighe immediately.

Contact us by phone or e-mail

We provide a free 30-minute initial consultation.

Phone: (603) 537-0700

E-mail: Kevin@TigheLaw.com

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